Immigration

Over the course of several months, refugee, immigrant, and citizen student participants from Algeria, England, and the United States had the opportunity to take part in a dialogue concerning Immigration. Their dialogue took the form of writing, drawing, and video. Some of their work is featured below. To read an edited transcript of their conversation, click here.
North Side Community Learning Center Responses 
Photo Gallery
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No street food, crowded,less tall buildings-WahHee Dar

"Diversity of all different kinds of people from all different places" - Ali Yerow

Living in the USA is hard/stressful - Halma Aden

"Food is cool (different) like Pizza!"- Amal, Malesud, Abdi

My family thinks everyone look all the same- Habso

"All Refugees are accepted in the United States"- Anonymous 

Freedom in being able to celebrate different things in different places- Sarah

"All Refugees are accepted in the United States"- Anonymous 

People judge you by your race, culture and religion 

Syracuse University Responses

DJ Fitzpatrick

"When thinking and talking about culture, I think my own personal culture is completely different from the stereotypical culture often associated with the United States. The culture I would like to talk about is that of Black Americans. I say Black Americans because based off of race my experiences are extremely different. From being doubted, discriminated, and even hated for something I myself can not control. I can not control that I am black, however I can thrive within my skin in as many ways as I possibly can."

"I think culture can be something that is scaled outward, like self identity in juxtaposition to societal stereotypes or something small like video games, or what you like to do in your free time. Personally, I like comics. I have a comic book podcast. We just did an episode on the Black Panther (who is a rad super hero if you don't know) I think comic book culture can be a particular angle to look at pop culture. Also maybe i'm a super hero myself.. You'll never know.."

Zach Barlow

Malea Lamb-Hall

"I think looking at culture and trying to understand how culture shifts and changes to fit our life experiences. Certain people have lived in many different places and experienced all types of living and culture. It's important to realize how culture can change based off of the life you have lived, who you have surrounded yourself with and what you have come to value. It can be the same over a lifetime but it can be open to changes as well."

Well first, I think one has to acknowledge that having a understanding of living in the United States does not directly correlate to understanding one's culture. For instance, I live in the United States but my experience is very different from many other people who also attend this school and live here in the states. When intersecting my ethnic identity with my gender, my identity lends itself to a different perspective of America. Being a black woman in America is an atypical experience from that of what can be seen as the everyday life of an American. Furthermore, within my own upbringing I have had an array of experiences that set me apart from other black women. When thinking about having someoone understand my culture , it would have to extend beyond national identity . It has to be an acknowledgement of regional experience, heritage, language, ethics, spiritual nature, and sociological positioning and understanding of one's privileges and disadvantages. What we need to know about living in the United States is that although it may be one country, it's not a monolithic experience.

Abigail Covington

Regina Cho

Because the United States is so diverse and influenced by so many other different cultures, it is difficult to explain briefly the essence of the overall culture. The perspective I can offer is mainly from the perspective of an first generation Asian American. Though my parents are not from this country, I am completely immersed in both American culture (food, pop culture, politics) and my Korean heritage (knowing the language, history, food, etc.). There are different communities in this country for people of the same ethnicity to gather and embrace their heritage, while also giving a chance to others to learn about the culture as well, which I appreciate. Navigating the balance between what is expected of me as an Asian American and what I truly expect of myself is very influenced by the culture around me. My major here in college, interests and friend groups may not be seen as the expected choices that fit the "stereotypical Asian" mold, but I think it's crucial to understand that there should not be a mold in the first place because America has room for people to pursue what they truly want to pursue.

Well first, I think one has to acknowledge that having a understanding of living in the United States does not directly correlate to understanding one's culture. For instance, I live in the United States but my experience is very different from many other people who also attend this school and live here in the states. When intersecting my ethnic identity with my gender, my identity lends itself to a different perspective of America. Being a black woman in America is an atypical experience from that of what can be seen as the everyday life of an American. Furthermore, within my own upbringing I have had an array of experiences that set me apart from other black women. When thinking about having someoone understand my culture , it would have to extend beyond national identity . It has to be an acknowledgement of regional experience, heritage, language, ethics, spiritual nature, and sociological positioning and understanding of one's privileges and disadvantages. What we need to know about living in the United States is that although it may be one country, it's not a monolithic experience.

Maia Wilson